Basho's thoughts on...
• What Children Do: Basho Honors the Young
• Introduction to this site
• The Human Story:
• Praise for Women
• Love and Sex in Basho
• Children and Teens
• Humanity and Friendship
• On Translating Basho
• Basho Himself
• Poetry and Music
• The Physical Body
• Food, Drink, and Fire
• Animals in Basho
• Space and Time
• Letters Year by Year
• Bilingual Basho 日本語も
• 芭蕉について日本語の論文
• Basho Renku, 芭蕉連句
• Women in Basho
• BAMHAY (Basho Amazes Me! How About You?)
• New Articles


Matsuo Basho 1644~1694

The only substantial
collection in English
of Basho's renku, tanka,
letters and spoken word
along with his haiku, travel
journals, and essays.

The only poet in old-time
literature who paid attention with praise
to ordinary women, children, and teenagers
in hundreds of poems

Hundreds upon hundreds of Basho works
(mostly renku)about women, children,
teenagers, friendship, compassion, love.

These are resources we can use to better
understand ourselves and humanity.

Interesting and heartfelt
(not scholarly and boring)
for anyone concerned with
humanity.


“An astonishing range of
social subject matter and
compassionate intuition”


"The primordial power
of the feminine emanating
from Basho's poetry"


Hopeful, life-affirming
messages from one of
the greatest minds ever.

Through his letters,
we travel through his mind
and discover Basho's
gentleness and humanity.

I plead for your help in
finding a person or group
to take over my 3000 pages of Basho material,
to edit and improve the material, to receive 100%
of royalties, to spread Basho’s wisdom worldwide
and preserve for future generations.

Quotations from Basho Prose


The days and months are
guests passing through eternity.
The years that go by
also are travelers.



The mountains in silence
nurture the spirit;
the water with movement
calms the emotions.


All the more joyful,
all the more caring


Seek not the traces
of the ancients;
seek rather the
places they sought.



Basho Spoken Word


Only this, apply your heart
to what children do


"The attachment to Oldness
is the very worst disease
a poet can have."


“The skillful have a disease;
let a three-foot child
get the poem"


"Be sick and tired
of yesterday’s self."


"This is the path of a fresh
lively taste with aliveness
in both heart and words."
.

"In poetry is a realm
which cannot be taught.
You must pass through it
yourself. Some poets have made
no effort to pass through, merely
counting things and trying
to remember them.
There was no passing
through the things."


"In verses of other poets,
there is too much making
and the heart’s
immediacy is lost.
What is made from
the heart is good;
the product of words
shall not be preferred."


"We can live without poetry,
yet without harmonizing
with the world’s feeling
and passing not through
human feeling, a person
cannot be fulfilled. Also,
without good friends,
this would be difficult."


"Poetry benefits
from the realization
of ordinary words."


"Many of my followers
write haiku equal to mine,
however in renku is the
bone marrow of this old man."


"Your following stanza
should suit the previous one as an expression
of the same heart's connection."


"Link verses the way
children play."


"Make renku
ride the Energy.
Get the timing wrong,
you ruin the rhythm."


"The physical form
first of all must be graceful
then a musical quality
makes a superior verse."

"As the years passed
by to half a century.
asleep I hovered
among morning clouds
and evening dusk,
awake I was astonished
at the voices of mountain
streams and wild birds."


“These flies sure enjoy
having an unexpected
sick person.”



Haiku of Humanity


Drunk on sake
woman wearing haori
puts in a sword


Night in spring
one hidden in mystery
temple corner


Wrapping rice cake
with one hands she tucks
hair behind ear


On Life's journey
plowing a small field
going and returning


Child of poverty
hulling rice, pauses to
look at the moon


Tone so clear
the Big Dipper resounds
her mallet


Huddling
under the futon, cold
horrible night


Jar cracks
with the ice at night
awakening



Basho Renku
Masterpieces

With her needle
in autumn she manages
to make ends meet
Daughter playing koto
reaches age seven


After the years
of grieving. . . finally
past eighteen
Day and night dreams of
Father in that battle


Now to this brothel
my body has been sold
Can I trust you
with a letter I wrote,
mirror polisher?


Only my face
by rice-seedling mud
is not soiled
Breastfeeding on my lap
what dreams do you see?



Single renku stanzas


Giving birth to
love in the world, she
adorns herself



Autumn wind
saying not a word
child in tears


Among women
one allowed to lead
them in chorus


Easing in
her slender forearm
for his pillow


Two death poems:


On a journey taken ill
dreams on withered fields
wander about

Clear cascade -
into the ripples fall
green pine needles




basho4humanity
@gmail.com




Plea for Affiliation

 

Plea For Affiliation

 

I pray for your help

in finding someone
individual, university,

or foundation - 
to take over my

3000 pages of material,   
to cooperate with me 

to edit the material,
to receive all royalties 

from sales, to spread

Basho’s wisdom worldwide,
and preserve for

future generations.


basho4humanity

@gmail.com

 



Home  >  Topics  >  Humanity and Friendship  >  D-05


Humanity Blossoms

12 Basho haiku, 9 renku, 1 tanka, 3 passages of speech

Legend:
Words of Basho in bold
Words of other poets not bold

Every Basho haiku in this chapter, and at least one stanza in every renku, is about cherry blossoms – however in each case “cherry blossoms” means human life or death. He may seem to be writing about cherry blossoms, but actually his and our thoughts go to the passage of human life.

 

In grief for Priest Tanto:

 

Falling to Earth
close to their roots,
blossoms part

 

The blossoms live their brief lives on the twigs, then fall to the ground to re-connect with their roots, as the Priest returns to his roots in the earth.

 

In full blossom, yeah!
the priests floating along
while wives slither

 

The usually serious Buddhist priests float along, and the otherwise demure self-effacing wives “slither” their hips in an erotic manner, all because of the exuberant “high” feeling that comes with cherry blossoms and spring

 

Miracles from
offerings to the Goddess
shining on blossoms

Bird of good fortune
builds nest with hemp

 

Basho sees the Sun Goddess Amaterasu in sunlight shining on cherry blossoms. One type of offering to this divine being is called taima, the same characters and pronunciation used for the hemp plant, as well as for the psychoactive cannabis. On YouTube you can see a Shinto priest fold a sheet of paper, traditionally of hemp fibers, in a zigzag pattern and attach to a wooden stick. The Ise Shrine, dedicated to the Sun Goddess, produces these in great numbers for priests to distribute to houses who have been supportive of the shrine. People wave the offerings before their household shrines to purify the space so their prayer reaches the Goddess.

 

The bird steals the hemp paper from the offerings; hemp fiber is strong, so makes a good nest for the bird of good fortune. Notice the links between the two stanzas: from blossoms to bird; from hemp offered to the gods to hemp stolen by birds, from Sun Goddess to female nesting bird, from miracles to good fortune.

 

In 1667, 23 year young Basho wrote:

 

In spring breeze
laughter bursting out
cherry blossoms

 

Human feeling becomes one with the seasons, and cherry blossoms appear at the very happiest time of the year – so the Japanese have their school graduations and commencements in cherry blossom time. Japanese poets for ten centuries have dwelled on the sadness of cherry blossoms passing away just one week after they bloom, however young Basho sees only happiness without the sad. This verse is not much of a haiku, however as a statement about the young life and laughter in Basho’s 22 year old mind, it is superb.

From his childhood Basho was page and companion to Yoshitada, a young relative of the daimyo living in Iga Castle, a ten minute walk from Basho’s house. They studied and made linked verses poetry together.

 

Basho’s third recorded haiku, in 1664, was written when he was with Yoshitada:

 

A faded beauty
blossoms — in old age
her memories

 

Here is an old woman, who can remember her days (and nights) of youthful elegance; she blossoms again along with the cherry trees, and the memories within her also emerge like blossoms. She is an Icon of the Feminine, a symbol for something larger than herself, the continuity from youth to old age. Her memories are an elegant foreground to the memories-yet-to-form in the tanka SPRING PASSES BY written to a newborn baby girl.

 

Asked in 1690 to name a newborn girl, Basho chose Kasane, ordinarily not a personal name, but rather a verb with meaning in space “to pile up, in layers”, and also in time “to occur again and again, in succession.” He wrote this tanka to his goddaughter:

 

Spring passes by
again and again in layers
of blossom kimono
may you see wrinkles
come with old age

 

The double and triple meanings – layers of kimono, of years, of generations; wrinkles in the kimono and in her face -- overlap to form a web of blessing and hope for Kasane and all female children. Kasane, now your time begins, stretching to infinity before unfocused eyes. Soon you’ll be laughing and playing in the sunshine – that is, if no wars come and natural disasters, fatal illness, and financial ruin stay away too. One spring in youth, you shall be given your first blossom-kimono.


A formal kimono is a two-layer silk robe worn over an under robe, meticulously folded and tucked around the body in flat, even layers. The colors and pattern are chosen in harmony with the woman’s age. A blossom-kimono for a girl entering womanhood might be a soft pink with bold cherry blossom design on the lower portion. A thick brocade sash of a darker contrasting color encircles her waist. The red inner robe, suitable for a party, shows at the neckline, and where the left side of the skirt covers the right, margins of the kimono lining appear and disappear as she walks.

 

The springs shall come and go with clouds of pink blossoms filling the treetops to fall in a shower of petals as you blossom into a young lady. Each year as you sit with legs folded under you on the straw mat under the trees, creases shall form in the fabric. Carefully, as your mother shows you restore its silky smoothness for another year. I pray the day comes for you to pass this youthful kimono onto your daughter, the next “layer” of yourself, while you wear one more moderate in color and pattern – and this too passes onto her, and you to the dark sedate kimono of an older woman. So Kasane, may our nation remain at Peace and the happiness in your family pile up layer upon layer until wrinkles in the fabric no longer smooth out and you see wrinkles of old age cross your face. Do not despair, my child, for you live again as spring passes by and your granddaughters laugh and chatter in their blossom kimono.

 

In his few simple words Basho speaks of what concerns women: the succession of life, the happiness of children—the conditions of Peace, both social and family, in which little girls can dress up and party with relatives and friends, and life goes on generation after generation. The poem in five short lines encapsulates the existence of one woman from newborn to old age. It transcends the boundaries of literature to become something greater, an ode to Life.

 

Before he found the word “Lightness” for his poetic ideal, Basho called it “Newness.” He said,


Newness is the flowering of poetry

 

Newness, or Lightness, is the beautiful part of poetry, as well as the part which contains the organs that give new life.

 

Blossom-viewing at the villa of Tangan,
the traces of the past as they were before

 

Many, many
things come to mind,
cherry blossoms

 

Sama zama no / koto omoi-idasu / sakura kana

 

The young man Tangan stands before Basho’s eyes in the same place Basho can remember him as an infant with his father alive – however even without that background, the verse can bring us memories today if we allow “cherry blossoms” to suggest the passage of time and life.


Basho’s verse says absolutely nothing new about cherry blossoms or memories – instead he ‘sums up and conceals’ a thousand years of poetic expression on these blossoms and the memories that pass from one cherry blossom season to the next. His words are completely, utterly simple. No complications. Seven ordinary words with the most basic grammar possible in Japanese. Because the haiku says so little, it says so much. Because the words have a 3-4-3 rhythm of spoken beats plus pauses in the upper and lower segments, they are a musical composition.


Basho said

The physical form first of all must be graceful
then the musical quality makes a superior verse.

 

Among the most memorable musical experiences in Japan is the song Sakura, a standard on the koto, or 13 string Japanese harp, commonly heard from loud speakers at famous sites for blossom viewing.

 

       Cherry Blossoms

       Traditional Folk Song

 

Cherry blossoms, cherry blossoms
In the sky of April, as far as I can see
Are they mist? Are they clouds?
with a fragrance emerging
Hey let’s go, hey let’s go out to see them.

 

In spite of the happy child-like words, the song in a minor key sounds melancholy. At the top of the score, the instructions to the musician are “solemn, stately.” Almost every note in the score is a straight quarter note with just a few half-notes and paired eighth-notes. There are no complicated notes at all. Since the meter is 4/4, the four quarter notes in each measure roll out with complete regularity. Because of its extreme structural simplicity, Sakura is the first piece a student is given to practice on the koto.

About half of the total notes have a distinct rhythm: two quarter notes on the same pitch followed by a half note one step higher:

 

Sa ku RA, Sa ku RA.

I za YA, I za YA

 

With this distinct rhythm of notes, the song makes us remember it.

 

The koto is an instrument of refinement, played exclusively by women. Consider the following a riddle:

 

Blossoms fall—
the bird was surprised
dust on the koto

 

A proverb says “beautiful music can move dust.” Basho says that the tones from the koto -- probably playing Sakura -- rise to the roof and their beauty startles a bird sitting on the exposed beams, so the bird dislodges some dust which falls—like cherry petals fluttering down – onto the harp and the woman playing it. Although never mentioned, she is central to the verse: she makes the music and she notices the dust.

 

Her beautiful
face has known more years
than she is tall--
Hand that plays the koto
writes letter of regret

Cherries in bloom
again she climbs the hill
to his grave

 

She has aged more in her face than normal for someone her height. Both her beauty and her suffering go into her harp notes, as well as into the letter she writes. Basho gives us some much to work with, yet leaves us infinite room to explore and create human feeling.


Cat fondly caressed
by the one I adore

To stop blossoms
from falling, if only
there was a way

 

Watching her caress this precious, furry living being, I love her all the more. If only there were a way to keep the young and gentle from growing old and bitter.

 

In the previous stanza (not given here) Etsujin has a woman at a memorial service for her husband. Basho  puts a small child on this bereaved woman’s lap, creating eternal beauty within the grief of losing a husband

 

A beautiful child
asleep on her lap

Far from village
under cherry in bloom
broiling tofu

 

Yugo takes this woman away from Etusjin’s memorial scene to a picnic under a cherry tree in bloom.  Is she broiling the tofu on skewers over glowing coals in a fire pit while her baby sleeps on her lap? Or is someone else broiling the tofu for her while she watches? I choose to make her the active one; the link is clearer that way. Then we have all the elements for an icon – a symbol for something far greater: mother with child on lap surrounded by nature: under cherry blossoms, the most iconic of Japanese seasonal events, she prepares food to sustain life while life sleeps on her lap.

 

The following haiku in the spring of 1690 marks the birth of Basho’s poetic ideal of Lightness:

 

Under the trees
soup, vinegar salad, and
blossoms hurray!

 

Ko no moto ni / shiru mo namasu mo / sakura kana

 

The scene the same in Basho’s time as in ours. The cold of early spring has passed, but there is still a chill in the air. Under a canopy of pinkish white blossoms, on ground scattered with petals, we lay out our favorite foods. The soup is brought to the picnic in an iron pot and heated over a fire. Namasu is raw vegetables or fish marinated in vinegar, popular at celebrations -- so the verse also contains the work of women preparing the food and cleaning up afterward. Amidst the excited chatter of girls and women in their blossom kimono, the songs and laughter of relatives and friends, some more petals have fallen on the food.

 

               (according to Doho)

 

At the time of this verse, the Master said,
“As I gained some feeling for the rhythm
in this verse on blossom-viewing, I made Lightness.”

 

Shirane defines Lightness as: “a stress on everyday common subject matter, on the use of vernacular language, and on a relaxed rhythmical seemingly artless expression”

-- all of these conspicuous in UNDER THE TREES.

 

To those who love Western poetry, Basho’s verses of Lightness will seem so simple and Light they feel like nothing – but they leave the reader feeling good -- as opposed to Heaviness which relies on heavy word associations and allegory to make the reader feel sad. Even without tragedy or sensationalism or negativity, however, Basho reaches into the human heart. In this verse, he reaches through taste sensations – soup which could be so many possibilities and marinade which could be any raw vegetable or fish, however imbued with the sour taste of vinegar. The cherry blossoms scatter onto these two taste images; a liquid food and a sour salad. The final kana is “emotive, exclamatory,” so “hurray!” We are celebrating the season of warmth and new Life. Lightness is Us, real people having fun, sharing food.


In Spring of 1985 Basho wrote a haiku with a headnote about meeting his friend-since-youth Doho:

 

At Mizuguchi meeting an old friend after twenty years:

 

It has lived
between our two lives
this cherry tree

 

You have gone your way and I have gone mine. Our paths intersect at this cherry tree in full bloom as it has blossomed and withered each of these twenty years. The tree having “lived between our two lives” is Basho’s expression for that mysterious connection between friends transcending physical separation. Through poetry Basho presents a philosophy of friendship.

 

This morning I found
a strand of white hair

Year after year
lined up under blossoms
number of friends

 

Once we find that first strand of while hair, the white hairs will increase while the friends decrease.

Two months before his death, although it was autumn, Basho wrote a Spring verse to his long-time followers aged like himself.

 

Unlike our faces
may your haiku emerge
as first blossoms

 

Though our faces are wrinkled and pockmarked by the ravages of time, our poems can be as fresh and vibrant as the first cherry blossoms to emerge on their twigs. About this verse Basho said


The physical form first of all must be graceful
then the musical quality makes a superior verse.

 

Blossoms’ full bloom
the mountains all day long
colors of dawn

 

The rosy pinkish white of wild cherry tree blossoms fills the mountain side, giving them the rosy colors of the sky at daybreak.

 

Deciding not to take
the doctor’s medicine

As cherries bloom
wandering place to place
in Yoshino mountains

 

The subject has decided to “go with the flow,” to let the disease run its course, either to decline or to recover on the body’s own healing resources.

 

Again he is thrown
Maruyama marked black

Half of go board
all over eastern Kyoto
blossoms scatter

 

Maruyama was a famous sumo wrestler in Basho’s time. A victory in sumo is recorded with a white circle, a loss with a black circle. Basho jumps from sumo to the board game of go, from Maruyama the wrestler to Maruyama a section of eastern Kyoto famous for cherry blossoms. The objective in go is to surround the opponent’s stones and remove them from the board. Here the one playing black is totally overwhelmed: white stones are everywhere on one side of the board, as if all the blossoms in the eastern half of Kyoto have fallen. Those of you who watch sumo, or play go, or hang out in Maruyama: this verse is for your especial enjoyment.

 

One of the more moving moments in Basho’s letters occurs in a letter to Kyoriku in Spring of 1693: Basho tells of his nephew dying of tuberculosis in Basho’s hut where Basho has nursed him since winter. He described the months of misery watching his nephew fade, but now spring has come.

 

The splendor of cherry blossoms dwells on my heart,
and thinking this the sick person’s final blossom season,
I took him to see them, and he was joyful.

 

Thank you, Basho, for your compassion. Even in this sad letter, Basho uses that word yorokobi, joy.

 

Basho wrote both of these stanzas in succession to end a renku sequence

 

Strike the bell
for fun, so blossoms
scatter upon us
Raving drunks along with
April came to an end

 

He begins with some nonsense about striking the temple bell for “fun” so the deeply resonant tones will knock the cherry blossoms from their twigs and we can enjoy having them flutter through the air and land on us, the raving drunks composing this renku sequence. .

 

Basho’s headnote to the following, Spring amusement at Ueno, tells us the blossom-viewing picnic was at the same place, Tokyo’s Ueno Park, so popular for these parties today:

 

Drunk on blossoms
woman wearing a haori,
puts in a sword

 

Hana ni yoeri / haori kite katana / sasu onna

 

Ordinary women in Edo work hard every day and the annual picnic under the cherry trees at Ueno is one of the very few days of the year when she can have fun. Most Japanese women are slender, especially in the upper body, and the kimono emphasizes that slenderness. This woman is intoxicated by the beauty of cherry blossoms everywhere around her, on the trees, petals in the air and all over the ground, and also by the beverages she has drunk. Having shed her ladylike social inhibitions, she is acting bold and assertive.

She has borrowed a padded haori coat from one of the men at the party (women do not wear haori in Basho’s time)and put it on over her kimono, adding some bulk to her chest, shoulders, and arms, making her look manly. This is a working class party, so there are no samurai present, and no swords either, but she is using something long and thin to pretend. The Japanese says she inserts (sasu) the ‘sword’ under her obi, the thick brocade sash around her waist. Then she does the ever-popular “Hey you guys! See how long my sword is!” sending the party into hysterics. We see the woman in the center of the action, strong, vibrant, and playful (with the aid of sake).

 

           basho4humanity@gmail.com 





<< Compassion in Basho (D-04) (D-06) Laughing Along >>


The Three Thirds of Basho

 

 

I plead for your help in finding a person or group to take over my 3000 pages of Basho material, to edit and improve the presentation, to receive all royalties from sales, to spread Basho’s wisdom worldwide and preserve for future generations.

 

basho4humanity@gmail.com
Basho's thoughts on...
• What Children Do: Basho Honors the Young
• Introduction to this site
• The Human Story:
• Praise for Women
• Love and Sex in Basho
• Children and Teens
• Humanity and Friendship
• On Translating Basho
• Basho Himself
• Poetry and Music
• The Physical Body
• Food, Drink, and Fire
• Animals in Basho
• Space and Time
• Letters Year by Year
• Bilingual Basho 日本語も
• 芭蕉について日本語の論文
• Basho Renku, 芭蕉連句
• Women in Basho
• BAMHAY (Basho Amazes Me! How About You?)
• New Articles


Matsuo Basho 1644~1694

The only substantial
collection in English
of Basho's renku, tanka,
letters and spoken word
along with his haiku, travel
journals, and essays.

The only poet in old-time
literature who paid attention with praise
to ordinary women, children, and teenagers
in hundreds of poems

Hundreds upon hundreds of Basho works
(mostly renku)about women, children,
teenagers, friendship, compassion, love.

These are resources we can use to better
understand ourselves and humanity.

Interesting and heartfelt
(not scholarly and boring)
for anyone concerned with
humanity.


“An astonishing range of
social subject matter and
compassionate intuition”


"The primordial power
of the feminine emanating
from Basho's poetry"


Hopeful, life-affirming
messages from one of
the greatest minds ever.

Through his letters,
we travel through his mind
and discover Basho's
gentleness and humanity.

I plead for your help in
finding a person or group
to take over my 3000 pages of Basho material,
to edit and improve the material, to receive 100%
of royalties, to spread Basho’s wisdom worldwide
and preserve for future generations.

Quotations from Basho Prose


The days and months are
guests passing through eternity.
The years that go by
also are travelers.



The mountains in silence
nurture the spirit;
the water with movement
calms the emotions.


All the more joyful,
all the more caring


Seek not the traces
of the ancients;
seek rather the
places they sought.



Basho Spoken Word


Only this, apply your heart
to what children do


"The attachment to Oldness
is the very worst disease
a poet can have."


“The skillful have a disease;
let a three-foot child
get the poem"


"Be sick and tired
of yesterday’s self."


"This is the path of a fresh
lively taste with aliveness
in both heart and words."
.

"In poetry is a realm
which cannot be taught.
You must pass through it
yourself. Some poets have made
no effort to pass through, merely
counting things and trying
to remember them.
There was no passing
through the things."


"In verses of other poets,
there is too much making
and the heart’s
immediacy is lost.
What is made from
the heart is good;
the product of words
shall not be preferred."


"We can live without poetry,
yet without harmonizing
with the world’s feeling
and passing not through
human feeling, a person
cannot be fulfilled. Also,
without good friends,
this would be difficult."


"Poetry benefits
from the realization
of ordinary words."


"Many of my followers
write haiku equal to mine,
however in renku is the
bone marrow of this old man."


"Your following stanza
should suit the previous one as an expression
of the same heart's connection."


"Link verses the way
children play."


"Make renku
ride the Energy.
Get the timing wrong,
you ruin the rhythm."


"The physical form
first of all must be graceful
then a musical quality
makes a superior verse."

"As the years passed
by to half a century.
asleep I hovered
among morning clouds
and evening dusk,
awake I was astonished
at the voices of mountain
streams and wild birds."


“These flies sure enjoy
having an unexpected
sick person.”



Haiku of Humanity


Drunk on sake
woman wearing haori
puts in a sword


Night in spring
one hidden in mystery
temple corner


Wrapping rice cake
with one hands she tucks
hair behind ear


On Life's journey
plowing a small field
going and returning


Child of poverty
hulling rice, pauses to
look at the moon


Tone so clear
the Big Dipper resounds
her mallet


Huddling
under the futon, cold
horrible night


Jar cracks
with the ice at night
awakening



Basho Renku
Masterpieces

With her needle
in autumn she manages
to make ends meet
Daughter playing koto
reaches age seven


After the years
of grieving. . . finally
past eighteen
Day and night dreams of
Father in that battle


Now to this brothel
my body has been sold
Can I trust you
with a letter I wrote,
mirror polisher?


Only my face
by rice-seedling mud
is not soiled
Breastfeeding on my lap
what dreams do you see?



Single renku stanzas


Giving birth to
love in the world, she
adorns herself



Autumn wind
saying not a word
child in tears


Among women
one allowed to lead
them in chorus


Easing in
her slender forearm
for his pillow


Two death poems:


On a journey taken ill
dreams on withered fields
wander about

Clear cascade -
into the ripples fall
green pine needles




basho4humanity
@gmail.com




Plea for Affiliation

 

Plea For Affiliation

 

I pray for your help

in finding someone
individual, university,

or foundation - 
to take over my

3000 pages of material,   
to cooperate with me 

to edit the material,
to receive all royalties 

from sales, to spread

Basho’s wisdom worldwide,
and preserve for

future generations.


basho4humanity

@gmail.com