Basho's thoughts on...
• What Children Do: Basho Honors the Young
• Introduction to this site
• The Human Story:
• Praise for Women
• Love and Sex in Basho
• Children and Teens
• Humanity and Friendship
• On Translating Basho
• Basho Himself
• Poetry and Music
• The Physical Body
• Food, Drink, and Fire
• Animals in Basho
• Space and Time
• Letters Year by Year
• Bilingual Basho 日本語も
• 芭蕉について日本語の論文
• Basho Renku, 芭蕉連句
• Women in Basho
• BAMHAY (Basho Amazes Me! How About You?)
• New Articles


Matsuo Basho 1644~1694

The only substantial
collection in English
of Basho's renku, tanka,
letters and spoken word
along with his haiku, travel
journals, and essays.

The only poet in old-time
literature who paid attention with praise
to ordinary women, children, and teenagers
in hundreds of poems

Hundreds upon hundreds of Basho works
(mostly renku)about women, children,
teenagers, friendship, compassion, love.

These are resources we can use to better
understand ourselves and humanity.

Interesting and heartfelt
(not scholarly and boring)
for anyone concerned with
humanity.


“An astonishing range of
social subject matter and
compassionate intuition”


"The primordial power
of the feminine emanating
from Basho's poetry"


Hopeful, life-affirming
messages from one of
the greatest minds ever.

Through his letters,
we travel through his mind
and discover Basho's
gentleness and humanity.

I plead for your help in
finding a person or group
to take over my 3000 pages of Basho material,
to edit and improve the material, to receive 100%
of royalties, to spread Basho’s wisdom worldwide
and preserve for future generations.

Quotations from Basho Prose


The days and months are
guests passing through eternity.
The years that go by
also are travelers.



The mountains in silence
nurture the spirit;
the water with movement
calms the emotions.


All the more joyful,
all the more caring


Seek not the traces
of the ancients;
seek rather the
places they sought.



Basho Spoken Word


Only this, apply your heart
to what children do


"The attachment to Oldness
is the very worst disease
a poet can have."


“The skillful have a disease;
let a three-foot child
get the poem"


"Be sick and tired
of yesterday’s self."


"This is the path of a fresh
lively taste with aliveness
in both heart and words."
.

"In poetry is a realm
which cannot be taught.
You must pass through it
yourself. Some poets have made
no effort to pass through, merely
counting things and trying
to remember them.
There was no passing
through the things."


"In verses of other poets,
there is too much making
and the heart’s
immediacy is lost.
What is made from
the heart is good;
the product of words
shall not be preferred."


"We can live without poetry,
yet without harmonizing
with the world’s feeling
and passing not through
human feeling, a person
cannot be fulfilled. Also,
without good friends,
this would be difficult."


"Poetry benefits
from the realization
of ordinary words."


"Many of my followers
write haiku equal to mine,
however in renku is the
bone marrow of this old man."


"Your following stanza
should suit the previous one as an expression
of the same heart's connection."


"Link verses the way
children play."


"Make renku
ride the Energy.
Get the timing wrong,
you ruin the rhythm."


"The physical form
first of all must be graceful
then a musical quality
makes a superior verse."

"As the years passed
by to half a century.
asleep I hovered
among morning clouds
and evening dusk,
awake I was astonished
at the voices of mountain
streams and wild birds."


“These flies sure enjoy
having an unexpected
sick person.”



Haiku of Humanity


Drunk on sake
woman wearing haori
puts in a sword


Night in spring
one hidden in mystery
temple corner


Wrapping rice cake
with one hands she tucks
hair behind ear


On Life's journey
plowing a small field
going and returning


Child of poverty
hulling rice, pauses to
look at the moon


Tone so clear
the Big Dipper resounds
her mallet


Huddling
under the futon, cold
horrible night


Jar cracks
with the ice at night
awakening



Basho Renku
Masterpieces

With her needle
in autumn she manages
to make ends meet
Daughter playing koto
reaches age seven


After the years
of grieving. . . finally
past eighteen
Day and night dreams of
Father in that battle


Now to this brothel
my body has been sold
Can I trust you
with a letter I wrote,
mirror polisher?


Only my face
by rice-seedling mud
is not soiled
Breastfeeding on my lap
what dreams do you see?



Single renku stanzas


Giving birth to
love in the world, she
adorns herself



Autumn wind
saying not a word
child in tears


Among women
one allowed to lead
them in chorus


Easing in
her slender forearm
for his pillow


Two death poems:


On a journey taken ill
dreams on withered fields
wander about

Clear cascade -
into the ripples fall
green pine needles




basho4humanity
@gmail.com




Plea for Affiliation

 

Plea For Affiliation

 

I pray for your help

in finding someone
individual, university,

or foundation - 
to take over my

3000 pages of material,   
to cooperate with me 

to edit the material,
to receive all royalties 

from sales, to spread

Basho’s wisdom worldwide,
and preserve for

future generations.


basho4humanity

@gmail.com

 



Home  >  Topics  >  Women in Basho  >  L-07


Mother as Icon

Portraying the nature of motherhood

Legend:
Words of Basho in bold
Words of other poets not bold

"From her position as healer, Ma’s hands had grown sure, and cool and quiet." -

John Steinbeck, The Grapes of Wrath. 

 

Basho, like Steinbeck, sees and creates a woman as an icon, a symbol for something greater than herself:

 

Seeds start to sprout

for our treasured grass
Giving birth to
love in the world, she
adorns herself

 

早苗 はじめて / 得し 寶 草

世の愛を / 産みけん人 の / 御 粧

 

Sanae hajimete / eshi takara kusa .

Yo no ai o /umiken hito no / on-yosoi

 

Infant rice plants look like ordinary grass, showing no sign that four months later they will yield the staple food of Asia.  A woman makes herself beautiful before and while giving birth – as Mother Earth puts on green make-up. We go from rice sprouting to woman giving birth to the child she loves, then return to Mother Earth giving birth to countless billion plants. Woman merges with Earth, each making herself beautiful, and within her beauty is the power of regeneration, the power to nurture life.

 

 


His old padded jacket
makes old age appear
Concentrating on aptivated by
the babe in remembrance
she put to sleep

 

古い羽織に /老ぞしらるる
つくづくと / 記念のややを / 寝させ置

 

Furui haori ni / oi zo shiraruru
Tsukuzuku to / katami no yaya o / nesase oki

 

In Basho’s time padded haori jackets were worn only by men.  Toku's stanza is entirely about a man, a man not so old, but the jacket he has worn for years makes him look old. The feminist Basho takes this stanza and with his stanza shifts to a mother-child focus.  Her husband has died, leaving her with a baby. She places his jacket on the sleeping baby for warmth, tucking the fabric around the tiny body; as she looks at her baby, memories of him flood her.


Basho changes the meanng of Toku's second line from "makes the old look old" to "makes the young look old."  Such is the interesting nature of renku.

 

The two kinds of sleep – nightly and eternal – blend in Basho’s words. As she puts baby to sleep, she is quite certain the little one will wake up in a number of hours, but still she wonders whether baby in a dream will visit father in the other world and maybe remain there with him.

 

 

Etsujin wrote a rather heavy stanza about a woman at a memorial service for her husband who has died; together with this stanza, Basho adds to the sadness by giving the widow a baby. But I am not giving you Etsujin’s stanza, but instead Basho’s together with the one that followed. Basho begins with life and aliveness, and the next poet compliments that.

 

A beautiful child
asleep on her lap
Far from village
under cherry in bloom
roasting tofu

 

美し子の / 膝にねぶりて

里遠き / 花の木陰に /とうふ 焼く

 

Utsukushii ko no / hiza ni neburite

Sato tōki / hana no kikage / tofu yaku

 

Basho creates a mother’s lap, a comfortable place on the mother’s body for  baby to lay or sit, where the two can touch and speak to each other; on the lap is where intelligence and language evolved. Yugo takes this woman to a picnic under a cherry tree in bloom.  She is an icon – a symbol for the sustenance of life. Mother and child surrounded by nature; under cherry blossoms, the most iconic of Japanese seasonal events, life sleeps on her lap while on a small fire she (or someone else) prepares food to sustain life. Here is Lightness, the absence of tragedies, death, or grief: simply life in peace and wholeness.

 

 

On straw mat

I am stuck with unsold
market greens
Crawling baby manages
to snatch rice from tray

 

一 むしろ / なぐれ 残る / 市 の 草
這いかかる 子 の / 飯 つかむ なり

 

Ichi mushiro / nagurete nokoru / ichi no kusa
Hai kakaru ko no / meshi tsukamu nari

 

Unsold produce she has to carry home is a problem, but not a major one -- not the catastrophic fires and earthquakes and war that energize most literature. It's just an annoyance,  so another example of Basho’s poetic ideal of Lightness; instead of heavy tragedies, ordinary annoyances.

 

The individual’s meal was served on several dishes on a small tray on four legs, about 18 inches square and 9 inches high. Instead of a baby getting sick and dying before she can walk, this baby, who has been a slave to gravity since birth, by crawling and clinging onto things gets high enough to pull rice off the tray, either to put in mouth, or to spread about. We see Basho’s consciousness of infant motor development; the child reaching up onto the 9-inch-high tray is a developmental milestone on the road to standing and walking; and from now mother will have to deal with all sorts of new problems that can the child can create, yet still

these are no more than annoyances.

 

Frantically
crying baby she thrusts
into the cradle
Carpenters and roofers
go home as it darkens

 

せりぜりと / なく子を /つきすえて

大工 屋根や の / 帰る 暮れどき

 

Serizeri to / naku ko o fugo ni / tsukisuete

Daiku yaneya no / kaeru kure-doki

 

Baby cries that panicky scream that so upsets adult ears.  Mother or babysitter busy with something else, to shut the kid up, thrusts baby into a cradle. Imagine the crying baby as a house under construction – busy, busy, busy with both carpenters inside the frame and around it, and roofers on top, sawing, hammering, moving things about, shouting to each other. As it grows dark, all leave and that house becomes absolutely silent.  Such is the magical quieting effect stimulation of the gravity-and-movement receptors in the inner ear on the infant.  Screaming, facial distortion, falling tears disappear into silence and peaceful breathing.

 

 

 

Sleeve on one side
missing, winter shower
gets inside robe
Four or five sons
barking in a ruckus

 

かた々は / 袖なききぬに / もる時雨
倅 四 五 人 / ほえて くるしき

 

Katagata wa / sode naki kinu ni / moru shigure
Segare yon go nin / hoete kurushiki
 

The cold rain gets inside the robe because instead of one sleeve is just a large opening around the shoulder. Why, you ask, is one sleeve missing? The family has five boys and apparently no girls, so no one to help mother make clothing for this zoo. She ran out of fabric while making multiple robes and had no time to

spin more yarn or do any weaving – what with all the chaos of five sons. The boy with his young blood will soon get used to his one naked arm. Boy! are they making a lot of noise, the sound of their humanity, the

ordinary hubbub of family life with multiple boys.

 

Glaring about
she orders the children
to “behave!”
While roasting bean paste
some ash she puffs away

 

行儀能 /せよと子供を /ねめ廻し

やき味噌の 灰 / 吹きはらいつつ


Gyougi you /se yo to kodomo o / neme-mawashi

Yaki miso no hai / fuki-harai-tsutsu

 

Children scattered about the room, mother at the sunken hearth in the center has to “glare about” –staring fiercely all around to address them all, not that they listen. The stanza abounds with human activity in three lively verbs: “glaring about,”  “orders” and her spoken command “behave!” and also the activity of the children: crawling, running, climbing, arguing, fighting, breaking or swallowing things, this winter day in 17th century Japan.

 

Meanwhile she is broiling balls of miso, soy bean paste, on skewers to make a side dish. A bit of ash from the fire has gotten on the sticky miso.  She lifts the skewer close to her mouth, purses her lips, and puffs a burst of air at the ash to propel it from the miso.  The astonishing delicacy of this action even the fingers of elves could not perform is the polar opposite of her glaring and shouting at her kids – yet both ordering and puffing are her breath, her life force the yogis call prana.

 

In Western literature females face romance and/or tragedy; they have beauty or virtue, or ugliness and evil. Basho says nothing at all about any f these.  He searches for and sees something completely different: a woman  simply alive, and expressing her life-force in a way which is whole, positive, and iconic.

                   

Father, Mother
their love unceasing
pheasant’s cluck

 

The green pheasant, cousin to the chicken/rooster, “symbolic of masculine might and prowess as well as maternal love and care, the national bird of Japan since 1947” although this designation is based on millennia of observations. An 8th century tanka describes the voice of the pheasant as horohoro, “melodious.”  Male scholars have taken this to be the sharp loud “cry” of the male – but a whole new way of experiencing human reality emerges from this haiku if instead we hear the gentle continuous clucking of the female pheasant to reassure her chicks.

 

Everything
for her son’s marriage
mother decides
Buds bursting open
area of cotton fields

             

祝言も /母が見て来て /究めけり

木綿ふきたつ / 高安の里

 

Shuugen mo / haha ga mite kite / kiwamekeri

Kiwata fukitatsu / takayasu no sato

 

 

 Mother knows best, and shows it. Basho switches from humanity to nature, but actually still speaks of humanity. As the extensive area of white cotton balls escapes from their buds, Mother gives birth to her son a second time, now to form his own life and family – or maybe Mama’s boy is escaping from her domineering influence. 

 

From slender threads
love gets so intense –
Though my thoughts
are of love, “eat something!”
she commands me
 

ほそき 筋 より /愛 つのり つつ

物 おもふ /身 に もの 喰え と/ せつかれて

 

Hosoki suji yori / ai tsunori tsutsu

Mono omou / mi ni mono kue to / setsukarete

  

Love starts out simple but somehow becomes “intense.” Basho shows us an adolescent girl and her mother dealing with each other:

 

“Although the turmoil of young love takes away all my appetite, mother insists I eat, to build up my slender body. Why can’t she understand that I cannot eat while this turmoil rages within me?  Mother, stop bugging me!” 


 This stanza-pair conveys the nature of that “generation gap” occurring between mothers and daughters in every time and every land.  We see  that mothers three hundred years ago worried about their daughters struggling to stay slender, and daughters hid their inner feelings from mothers, so the problem could never be resolved.


 Along with being poetry, this is sociology and anthropology. Daughter thinks about love while mother about nutrition, so there can be no meeting of minds. May this verse help each of them see from the other point of view. 

 

To quiet down                              
the unsettled heart
of the daughter
Night sweets have stopped
in this morning’s dream
 

定らぬ /娘の心 / 取しづめ

寝汗のとまる / 今朝がたの夢


 Sadamaranu / musume no kokoro / tori shizume

Ne-ase no tomaru / kesa gata no yume

 

Basho suggests, in a stanza suitable for a modern parenting magazine, the turmoil in the heart of a teenage girl: she broods over thoughts of love, upset to hysteria, shaking all over.  Basho creates that emotional turmoil, but also creates a compassionate and understanding mother to calm down her daughter, to say the right words in the right tone to soothe and settle her heart.

 

Shiko follows his Master’s frequent focus on the physical female body. he makes the passion psycho-somatic; the blasts of adolescent hormones produce night sweats, copious perspiration which soaks her nightclothes and bedding, usually accompanied by emotional crying.  After the mother in Basho’s stanza quiets down her daughter so she falls asleep, Shiko creates the dreams which end the turmoil and return the brain to normal as a new sun rises. 

 

Basho portrays the mother caring, with sensitivity and wisdom, for her daughter who is just the way she was twenty years before. Sam Hamill, a scholar who knows only Basho haiku and not his renku, claims that Basho was “at times, cold-hearted, inhuman” – however the Basho poems unknown to Hamill overflow with personal and intimate details. They come alive with itawaru, caring for others.  


Arising to blow on embers
the wife of a bell-ringer
Going and returning
she calls for her lost child,
moonlight and stars

 

おきて火をふく かねつきがつま

行かえり /まよいごよばる / 星世夜

 

Okite hi o fuku / kanetsuki ga tsuma
Iki kaeri / mayoi-go yobaru / hoshi tsuki yo

 

Before going to bed, she banked the fire, covering the coals with ashes to remain alive till morning when

she arouses them with her breath. Her husband wakes up the town, but Basho has eyes only for the wife, getting up in the freezing winter dawn to, like a goddess, wake up the fire. She may be blowing directly

onto the coals, or through a bamboo tube. She is eternal, a goddess of fire, proclaimed by bells.


Then at night she alerts the town to her child being lost.  The stars in the night sky resemble the glowing embers in the ashes of the fire pit. Both stanzas focus attention on the woman, her breath and her activity expressed by an abundance of lively active verbs.

 

                   --------------------------------------------

 

The previous stanza to the following, not by Basho, is a scene from a Noh play, so is Japanese literary.  From that localized literary image, Basho creates a verse for all mothers in any place or time:

 


Mother of a lost child
is your pelvis upset?

 

迷ひ子の母 腰がぬけたか

Mayoi go no haha / koshi ga nuketa ka

 

Here is an idea women may appreciate, however difficult to imagine coming from the austere impersonal monk that Basho is said to have been: the idea that a mother feels her child’s unexplained absence physically in her pelvis where she carried that child for nine months. The verse is so physical, in the body – yet not sexual.

 

By moonlight

my poor mother at work
beside the window
She would hide fingers
stained with indigo

 

もる月を / 賤しき 母 の / 窓 に 見て
藍 にしみ 付く / 指かくすらん

 

Moru tsuki o / iyashiki haha no / mado ni mite
Ai ni shimi tsuku / yubi kakusuran

 

Mother, while her family sleeps, sews or mends their clothing in that light from above through open window.

From this iconic maternal image, Basho zooms in on her fingers stained from years of dyeing cloth with indigo; she feels the need to cover them with fabric to hide that strange inhuman color in the moonlight. The blue tint draws the eyes in our minds to her fingers – where we see the ‘traces’ of all the work she has done with those fingers.Because the Japanese for "love" is pronounced ai, the same as "indigo," these

are “fingers stained with love.”

 

Renku scholar Miyawaki Masahiko says,

 

In the behavior of mother hiding her fingers, the child separated far from her realizes her personality. The moonlight conveys the feelings in the child’s heart along with memories of mother working in desperation to raise us in spite of poverty.

 

 

The link – the thoughts that take us – from Iugen’s stanza to Basho’s reveals the vast range of Basho’s genius. Only Basho could create a link such as this, so personal and bodily yet so full of female heart.


Both the Mona Lisa and Whistler’s Mother rest their hands motionless on the lap; Michelangelo’s Pieta holds the dead Jesus motionless on her lap. Basho surpasses these icons by giving the hands of the Eternal Mother activity and consciousness.

 

 

basho4humanity@gmail.com


 






<< Breastfeeding with Basho (L-06 ) (L-08) A Year of Women >>


The Three Thirds of Basho

 

 

I plead for your help in finding a person or group to take over my 3000 pages of Basho material, to edit and improve the presentation, to receive all royalties from sales, to spread Basho’s wisdom worldwide and preserve for future generations.

 

basho4humanity@gmail.com
Basho's thoughts on...
• What Children Do: Basho Honors the Young
• Introduction to this site
• The Human Story:
• Praise for Women
• Love and Sex in Basho
• Children and Teens
• Humanity and Friendship
• On Translating Basho
• Basho Himself
• Poetry and Music
• The Physical Body
• Food, Drink, and Fire
• Animals in Basho
• Space and Time
• Letters Year by Year
• Bilingual Basho 日本語も
• 芭蕉について日本語の論文
• Basho Renku, 芭蕉連句
• Women in Basho
• BAMHAY (Basho Amazes Me! How About You?)
• New Articles


Matsuo Basho 1644~1694

The only substantial
collection in English
of Basho's renku, tanka,
letters and spoken word
along with his haiku, travel
journals, and essays.

The only poet in old-time
literature who paid attention with praise
to ordinary women, children, and teenagers
in hundreds of poems

Hundreds upon hundreds of Basho works
(mostly renku)about women, children,
teenagers, friendship, compassion, love.

These are resources we can use to better
understand ourselves and humanity.

Interesting and heartfelt
(not scholarly and boring)
for anyone concerned with
humanity.


“An astonishing range of
social subject matter and
compassionate intuition”


"The primordial power
of the feminine emanating
from Basho's poetry"


Hopeful, life-affirming
messages from one of
the greatest minds ever.

Through his letters,
we travel through his mind
and discover Basho's
gentleness and humanity.

I plead for your help in
finding a person or group
to take over my 3000 pages of Basho material,
to edit and improve the material, to receive 100%
of royalties, to spread Basho’s wisdom worldwide
and preserve for future generations.

Quotations from Basho Prose


The days and months are
guests passing through eternity.
The years that go by
also are travelers.



The mountains in silence
nurture the spirit;
the water with movement
calms the emotions.


All the more joyful,
all the more caring


Seek not the traces
of the ancients;
seek rather the
places they sought.



Basho Spoken Word


Only this, apply your heart
to what children do


"The attachment to Oldness
is the very worst disease
a poet can have."


“The skillful have a disease;
let a three-foot child
get the poem"


"Be sick and tired
of yesterday’s self."


"This is the path of a fresh
lively taste with aliveness
in both heart and words."
.

"In poetry is a realm
which cannot be taught.
You must pass through it
yourself. Some poets have made
no effort to pass through, merely
counting things and trying
to remember them.
There was no passing
through the things."


"In verses of other poets,
there is too much making
and the heart’s
immediacy is lost.
What is made from
the heart is good;
the product of words
shall not be preferred."


"We can live without poetry,
yet without harmonizing
with the world’s feeling
and passing not through
human feeling, a person
cannot be fulfilled. Also,
without good friends,
this would be difficult."


"Poetry benefits
from the realization
of ordinary words."


"Many of my followers
write haiku equal to mine,
however in renku is the
bone marrow of this old man."


"Your following stanza
should suit the previous one as an expression
of the same heart's connection."


"Link verses the way
children play."


"Make renku
ride the Energy.
Get the timing wrong,
you ruin the rhythm."


"The physical form
first of all must be graceful
then a musical quality
makes a superior verse."

"As the years passed
by to half a century.
asleep I hovered
among morning clouds
and evening dusk,
awake I was astonished
at the voices of mountain
streams and wild birds."


“These flies sure enjoy
having an unexpected
sick person.”



Haiku of Humanity


Drunk on sake
woman wearing haori
puts in a sword


Night in spring
one hidden in mystery
temple corner


Wrapping rice cake
with one hands she tucks
hair behind ear


On Life's journey
plowing a small field
going and returning


Child of poverty
hulling rice, pauses to
look at the moon


Tone so clear
the Big Dipper resounds
her mallet


Huddling
under the futon, cold
horrible night


Jar cracks
with the ice at night
awakening



Basho Renku
Masterpieces

With her needle
in autumn she manages
to make ends meet
Daughter playing koto
reaches age seven


After the years
of grieving. . . finally
past eighteen
Day and night dreams of
Father in that battle


Now to this brothel
my body has been sold
Can I trust you
with a letter I wrote,
mirror polisher?


Only my face
by rice-seedling mud
is not soiled
Breastfeeding on my lap
what dreams do you see?



Single renku stanzas


Giving birth to
love in the world, she
adorns herself



Autumn wind
saying not a word
child in tears


Among women
one allowed to lead
them in chorus


Easing in
her slender forearm
for his pillow


Two death poems:


On a journey taken ill
dreams on withered fields
wander about

Clear cascade -
into the ripples fall
green pine needles




basho4humanity
@gmail.com




Plea for Affiliation

 

Plea For Affiliation

 

I pray for your help

in finding someone
individual, university,

or foundation - 
to take over my

3000 pages of material,   
to cooperate with me 

to edit the material,
to receive all royalties 

from sales, to spread

Basho’s wisdom worldwide,
and preserve for

future generations.


basho4humanity

@gmail.com